Tag Archives: Di Botcher

Casualty: Iain is a free man after being briefly banged up

(Series 33, ep. 22 by Rachel Paterson 2.2.19)  There’s a proper Casualty review over at Metro, but one or two extra ponderings before you go.

– I really like the way Jan says Iain’s name in her Welsh accent, especially when she’s a bit cross with him. She did turn on him rather quickly, though, didn’t she? I suppose she was blinkered by maternal love for Nasty Ross. Charlie wasn’t fooled, though. Not only is he an excellent judge of staff, but he’s also been-there-done-that with waste of skin son Louis, so he knows a wrong ’un when he sees one.

– Michael Stevenson has been doing excellent work with what must have been a rather gruelling storyline. Iain’s speech to the DC about the drug victims he’d had to pick up in his job was really powerful.

– I think Ethan deleting Alicia’s number was just meant to be symbolic. As someone on Twitter pointed out, the next time she rings him her number will reappear on his phone again so it hasn’t gone forever, unless she never rings him again of course.

– I’m looking forward to Louise fighting the powers-that-be to protect her nurses. I love Louise when she’s having a good old righteous scowl at people.

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The Joy of Sets: Stella

ruth jones stella(Guest post by Grace C)

I recently made a trip to London to visit a childhood friend of mine. With both of us having moved on to concrete pastures away from our green-belted Scottish haven, it was inevitable that we would end up with a bottle of wine reminiscing long into the night. It’s fair to say that one of the most common causes of our laugher were discussions around the particular oddball characters or town quirks that formed the backdrop of our youth. Like a homemade patchwork quilt, we all have our distinctive squares coloured by different accents, houses or backgrounds, but the feel of it is the same. It provides a familiar comfort, even if at times it can be a little itchy or smothering.

Relating to the nostalgic intimacy of a tight-knit, eccentric community isn’t what drew me to Stella (it was the presence of the talented Ben Glover on the soundtrack that did that), but it is a main part of what got me hooked. It wasn’t a shock that such a vivid and relatable character-led comedy drama would come from Ruth Jones; the whirlwind success of Gavin and Stacey proved she is Queen of the small-town caricature, but there is something about the extra grit and emotion alongside this that gives Stella its own identity. Before the end of the first episode you already feel an attachment to the characters, both those who are there purely as eclectic village furniture and also those who fulfil the more dimensional roles.  Continue reading

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